Stratford upon Avon
Stratford upon Avon

 

RSC (47 kbytes) - Click to enlarge

RSC



Shakespeare : RSC across River (67 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : RSC across River



Luxury Restaurant Cruiser (78 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Luxury Restaurant Cruiser



Metal Swan Sculpture (121 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Metal Swan Sculpture



Shakespeare : Swan Theatre frontage (78 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : Swan Theatre frontage



Shakespeare  Swan Theatre from rear (50 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare Swan Theatre from rear



A Swan (62 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
A Swan



Lock (99 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Lock



Boatload of picture volunteers (75 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Boatload of picture volunteers



Restaurant - Caffe Uno (58 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Restaurant - Caffe Uno



Restaurant - Greek Connection (88 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Restaurant - Greek Connection



Shakespeare : Shakespeare's Birthplace (64 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : Shakespeare's Birthplace



Coffee House (67 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Coffee House



Restaurant - The Opposition (48 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Restaurant - The Opposition



River Crossing (82 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
River Crossing



Rapids! (83 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Rapids!



Swan by the river (161 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Swan by the river



Garden by lock (63 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Garden by lock



Boats (67 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Boats



Picnic spot across from Trinity (196 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Picnic spot across from Trinity



RSC Rehearsal room (67 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
RSC Rehearsal room



Shakespeare : RSC Backstage (63 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : RSC Backstage



Shakespeare : Gower Memorial - Hamlet (47 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : Gower Memorial - Hamlet



Shakespeare : Gower Memorial - Falstaff (112 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : Gower Memorial - Falstaff



Shakespeare : RSC - Model stage for A and C (52 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : RSC - Model stage for A and C



Ducks on bank of the Avon (81 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Ducks on bank of the Avon



Shakespeare : Inside the Swan Theatre (67 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : Inside the Swan Theatre



RSC - Othello (94 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
RSC - Othello



Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction
Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction



Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction
Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction



Stella Gonet and Alex Jennings (89 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Stella Gonet and Alex Jennings



Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction
Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction



Shakespeare : Shakespeare Institute Garden (223 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : Shakespeare Institute Garden



Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction
Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction



Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction
Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction



Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction
Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction



Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction
Lisa Keatley is down for reconstruction



Shakespeare : Stratford Swan Theatre (81 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : Stratford Swan Theatre



Stratford, by the River in Winter (101 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Stratford, by the River in Winter



Shakespeare : Stratford, Swan Theatre (47 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Shakespeare : Stratford, Swan Theatre



Stratford, Swans and Ducks (61 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Stratford, Swans and Ducks



Stratford, Swan and Ducks (71 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Stratford, Swan and Ducks



Stratford, The River In Winter (60 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Stratford, The River In Winter



Stratford - Swan (38 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Stratford - Swan



Stratford, Trinity Church from Across The River (51 kbytes) - Click to enlarge
Stratford, Trinity Church from Across The River



Stratford Seven Meadows (36 kbytes) - Click to enlarge/Show video
Stratford Seven Meadows with Video









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Date: Wed, 08 Sep 1999 09:02:22 +0100
From: Lisa <L.Keatley@ftel.co.uk>
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Hi John
Could you e-mail it to me as I don't have a fixed address yet!
I leave Friday (yippee) and you are welcome to join us for a heavynight
drinking starting in Browns at 9pm if you like.
My e-mail address when I leave is lk2@coventry.ac.uk.
Take care
Lisa


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From: Lisa <L.Keatley@ftel.co.uk>
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Let me know when you want to go, i can't remember whether I gave youmy
Coventry e-mail address, if not it is lk2@coventry.ac.uk.
I'll be in Gran Canaria from the 12 of sept to the 27th.
I assume we will be in the wine bar but there is a chance we will goto the
Bell on Friday. We are going for a pizza before we go drink if youwould like
to go to that.
It will probably be at 8pm at Gringo's but the time may change beingearlier.
(Gringo's is near the Odean, on the same side of the road but furtherdown away
from the city center.)
Lisa
 
 
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From: "Lisa Keatley" <lisKeatley@hotmail.com>
To: john_g_moore@hotmail.com
Subject: RE: Fujitsu
Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 19:12:43 +0000
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Hello John
Nice to hear from you, I ony did one lesson of Aikido as with my StJohn's work I didn't really have the time and now I have a puppy so don'thave anytime now!
You don't owe me anything, I can't even remember the videos you aretalking about sorry!
Are you still there then? and Lisa too? I lost touch with her afteruni, very busy time tho, finding a career and all. I'm on my second career!I was a graphic desinger for Brian Hyde Limited and now I'm a ProductionAssistant for a group of radio stations working on the adverts.
Please up date me on what you are doing and everything. Do you go tothe Stratford Aikido club? I live in Stratford now, dating a techie fromthe theatre and live with him on Evesham Road.
If you are about let me know we can meet in the duck for a pint.
Take care
Lisa
XXX
 
 
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Hi John
you are welcome to put my picture anywhere, well not on porn sites!I don't think I saw you... it's been a while and I need glasses now sonever sure if the blurry person walking towards me is someone I know ornot! Been busy too what will and hectic job, st johns, socialising, tomand my pup.
Will be out and about Sunday, usual haunts are the Duck and the Windmilll.Or you might see me walking Brando along the river.
Hope you are well, sorry for the delay in getting back to you, not allowedto use the internet at work and rarely get change at home.
Take care
Lisa
XXX
 
 
 
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Here is a pic of me, Brando my pup and Bensley Brando's uncle!
See you soon, take care
XXX
 
 
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If you remember anything about me John remember I have a very good senseof humour so as long as I see what you do I don't mind and i only wantto see for the laugh!
Here is the one with me in!
Have fun
XXX
 
 
 
 
 
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 Hi john
 
 Go ahead with whatever you think will work, I am happy for youto play around and see what you get. Managed to take this for the orc butit isnt too good. a bit bright but feel free to use it
 
 XXX
 

 
 
 
 
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 The camera works now, it's just finding time. Decorating the houseat the moment and have quite a few st john dutys coming up, motor cross,speedway and stock cars!!
 
 I think with liz you need a more memerable picture for peopleto know it is a cross between me and her, which is her famous black dressand red dress knickers flashing thing.
 
 Will see what I can do
 
 XXX
 

 
 

Links

Links

Shakespeare Pieces
 
 

Henry V

This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:'
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'
Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember with advantages
What feats he did that day: then shall our names.
Familiar in his mouth as household words
Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remember'd;
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.
 

================================================================

Julius Ceasar

ANTONY
    Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
    I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them;
    The good is oft interred with their bones;
    So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
    Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
    If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
    And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it.
    Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest--
    For Brutus is an honourable man;
    So are they all, all honourable men--
    Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
    He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
    But Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And Brutus is an honourable man.
    He hath brought many captives home to Rome
    Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
    Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
    When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
    Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
    Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And Brutus is an honourable man.
    You all did see that on the Lupercal
    I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
    Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
    Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And, sure, he is an honourable man.
    I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
    But here I am to speak what I do know.
    You all did love him once, not without cause:
    What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him?
    O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
    And men have lost their reason. Bear with me;
    My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
    And I must pause till it come back to me.

First Citizen

    Methinks there is much reason in his sayings.

Second Citizen

    If thou consider rightly of the matter,
    Caesar has had great wrong.

Third Citizen

    Has he, masters?
    I fear there will a worse come in his place.

Fourth Citizen

    Mark'd ye his words? He would not take the crown;
    Therefore 'tis certain he was not ambitious.

First Citizen

    If it be found so, some will dear abide it.

Second Citizen

    Poor soul! his eyes are red as fire with weeping.

Third Citizen

    There's not a nobler man in Rome than Antony.

Fourth Citizen

    Now mark him, he begins again to speak.

ANTONY

    But yesterday the word of Caesar might
    Have stood against the world; now lies he there.
    And none so poor to do him reverence.
    O masters, if I were disposed to stir
    Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage,
    I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong,
    Who, you all know, are honourable men:
    I will not do them wrong; I rather choose
    To wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you,
    Than I will wrong such honourable men.
    But here's a parchment with the seal of Caesar;
    I found it in his closet, 'tis his will:
    Let but the commons hear this testament--
    Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read--
    And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds
    And dip their napkins in his sacred blood,
    Yea, beg a hair of him for memory,
    And, dying, mention it within their wills,
    Bequeathing it as a rich legacy
    Unto their issue.

Fourth Citizen

    We'll hear the will: read it, Mark Antony.

All

    The will, the will! we will hear Caesar's will.

ANTONY

    Have patience, gentle friends, I must not read it;
    It is not meet you know how Caesar loved you.
    You are not wood, you are not stones, but men;
    And, being men, bearing the will of Caesar,
    It will inflame you, it will make you mad:
    'Tis good you know not that you are his heirs;
    For, if you should, O, what would come of it!

Fourth Citizen

    Read the will; we'll hear it, Antony;
    You shall read us the will, Caesar's will.

ANTONY

    Will you be patient? will you stay awhile?
    I have o'ershot myself to tell you of it:
    I fear I wrong the honourable men
    Whose daggers have stabb'd Caesar; I do fear it.

Fourth Citizen

    They were traitors: honourable men!

All

    The will! the testament!

Second Citizen

    They were villains, murderers: the will! read the will.

ANTONY

    You will compel me, then, to read the will?
    Then make a ring about the corpse of Caesar,
    And let me show you him that made the will.
    Shall I descend? and will you give me leave?

Several Citizens

    Come down.

Second Citizen

    Descend.

Third Citizen

    You shall have leave.

    ANTONY comes down

Fourth Citizen

    A ring; stand round.

First Citizen

    Stand from the hearse, stand from the body.

Second Citizen

    Room for Antony, most noble Antony.

ANTONY

    Nay, press not so upon me; stand far off.

Several Citizens

    Stand back; room; bear back.

ANTONY

    If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.
    You all do know this mantle: I remember
    The first time ever Caesar put it on;
    'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent,
    That day he overcame the Nervii:
    Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through:
    See what a rent the envious Casca made:
    Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd;
    And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away,
    Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it,
    As rushing out of doors, to be resolved
    If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no;
    For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel:
    Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him!
    This was the most unkindest cut of all;
    For when the noble Caesar saw him stab,
    Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms,
    Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart;
    And, in his mantle muffling up his face,
    Even at the base of Pompey's statua,
    Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
    O, what a fall was there, my countrymen!
    Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,
    Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us.
    O, now you weep; and, I perceive, you feel
    The dint of pity: these are gracious drops.
    Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold
    Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here,
    Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors.

First Citizen

    O piteous spectacle!

Second Citizen

    O noble Caesar!

Third Citizen

    O woful day!

Fourth Citizen

    O traitors, villains!

First Citizen

    O most bloody sight!

Second Citizen

    We will be revenged.

All

    Revenge! About! Seek! Burn! Fire! Kill! Slay!
    Let not a traitor live!

ANTONY

    Stay, countrymen.

First Citizen

    Peace there! hear the noble Antony.

Second Citizen

    We'll hear him, we'll follow him, we'll die with him.

ANTONY

    Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up
    To such a sudden flood of mutiny.
    They that have done this deed are honourable:
    What private griefs they have, alas, I know not,
    That made them do it: they are wise and honourable,
    And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
    I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts:
    I am no orator, as Brutus is;
    But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man,
    That love my friend; and that they know full well
    That gave me public leave to speak of him:
    For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth,
    Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech,
    To stir men's blood: I only speak right on;
    I tell you that which you yourselves do know;
    Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths,
    And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus,
    And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony
    Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue
    In every wound of Caesar that should move
    The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

All

    We'll mutiny.

First Citizen

    We'll burn the house of Brutus.

Third Citizen

    Away, then! come, seek the conspirators.

ANTONY

    Yet hear me, countrymen; yet hear me speak.

All

    Peace, ho! Hear Antony. Most noble Antony!

ANTONY

    Why, friends, you go to do you know not what:
    Wherein hath Caesar thus deserved your loves?
    Alas, you know not: I must tell you then:
    You have forgot the will I told you of.

All

    Most true. The will! Let's stay and hear the will.

ANTONY

    Here is the will, and under Caesar's seal.
    To every Roman citizen he gives,
    To every several man, seventy-five drachmas.

Second Citizen

    Most noble Caesar! We'll revenge his death.

Third Citizen

    O royal Caesar!

ANTONY

    Hear me with patience.

All

    Peace, ho!

ANTONY

    Moreover, he hath left you all his walks,
    His private arbours and new-planted orchards,
    On this side Tiber; he hath left them you,
    And to your heirs for ever, common pleasures,
    To walk abroad, and recreate yourselves.
    Here was a Caesar! when comes such another?
 

================================================================
 

Hamlet

HAMLET

    Seems, madam! nay it is; I know not 'seems.'
    'Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother,
    Nor customary suits of solemn black,
    Nor windy suspiration of forced breath,
    No, nor the fruitful river in the eye,
    Nor the dejected 'havior of the visage,
    Together with all forms, moods, shapes of grief,
    That can denote me truly: these indeed seem,
    For they are actions that a man might play:
    But I have that within which passeth show;
    These but the trappings and the suits of woe.
 
 
HAMLET

    O, that this too too solid flesh would melt
    Thaw and resolve itself into a dew!
    Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd
    His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! God!
    How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable,
    Seem to me all the uses of this world!
    Fie on't! ah fie! 'tis an unweeded garden,
    That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature
    Possess it merely. That it should come to this!
    But two months dead: nay, not so much, not two:
    So excellent a king; that was, to this,
    Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother
    That he might not beteem the winds of heaven
    Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!
    Must I remember? why, she would hang on him,
    As if increase of appetite had grown
    By what it fed on: and yet, within a month--
    Let me not think on't--Frailty, thy name is woman!--
    A little month, or ere those shoes were old
    With which she follow'd my poor father's body,
    Like Niobe, all tears:--why she, even she--
    O, God! a beast, that wants discourse of reason,
    Would have mourn'd longer--married with my uncle,
    My father's brother, but no more like my father
    Than I to Hercules: within a month:
    Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears
    Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,
    She married. O, most wicked speed, to post
    With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!
    It is not nor it cannot come to good:
    But break, my heart; for I must hold my tongue.
 
 
HAMLET

    Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to
    you, trippingly on the tongue: but if you mouth it,
    as many of your players do, I had as lief the
    town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air
    too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently;
    for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say,
    the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget
    a temperance that may give it smoothness. O, it
    offends me to the soul to hear a robustious
    periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to
    very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who
    for the most part are capable of nothing but
    inexplicable dumbshows and noise: I would have such
    a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it
    out-herods Herod: pray you, avoid it.
 
 
First Player

    I warrant your honour.

HAMLET

    Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion
    be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the
    word to the action; with this special o'erstep not
    the modesty of nature: for any thing so overdone is
    from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the
    first and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the
    mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature,
    scorn her own image, and the very age and body of
    the time his form and pressure. Now this overdone,
    or come tardy off, though it make the unskilful
    laugh, cannot but make the judicious grieve; the
    censure of the which one must in your allowance
    o'erweigh a whole theatre of others. O, there be
    players that I have seen play, and heard others
    praise, and that highly, not to speak it profanely,
    that, neither having the accent of Christians nor
    the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so
    strutted and bellowed that I have thought some of
    nature's journeymen had made men and not made them
    well, they imitated humanity so abominably.
 
 

First Player

    I hope we have reformed that indifferently with us,
    sir.

HAMLET

    O, reform it altogether. And let those that play
    your clowns speak no more than is set down for them;
    for there be of them that will themselves laugh, to
    set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh
    too; though, in the mean time, some necessary
    question of the play be then to be considered:
    that's villanous, and shows a most pitiful ambition
    in the fool that uses it. Go, make you ready.
 
 

HAMLET

    Nay, do not think I flatter;
    For what advancement may I hope from thee
    That no revenue hast but thy good spirits,
    To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd?
    No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp,
    And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee
    Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear?
    Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice
    And could of men distinguish, her election
    Hath seal'd thee for herself; for thou hast been
    As one, in suffering all, that suffers nothing,
    A man that fortune's buffets and rewards
    Hast ta'en with equal thanks: and blest are those
    Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled,
    That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger
    To sound what stop she please. Give me that man
    That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
    In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
    As I do thee.--Something too much of this.--
    There is a play to-night before the king;
    One scene of it comes near the circumstance
    Which I have told thee of my father's death:
    I prithee, when thou seest that act afoot,
    Even with the very comment of thy soul
    Observe mine uncle: if his occulted guilt
    Do not itself unkennel in one speech,
    It is a damned ghost that we have seen,
    And my imaginations are as foul
    As Vulcan's stithy. Give him heedful note;
    For I mine eyes will rivet to his face,
    And after we will both our judgments join
    In censure of his seeming.
 
 

HAMLET

    'Tis as easy as lying: govern these ventages with
    your lingers and thumb, give it breath with your
    mouth, and it will discourse most eloquent music.
    Look you, these are the stops.

GUILDENSTERN

    But these cannot I command to any utterance of
    harmony; I have not the skill.

HAMLET

    Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of
    me! You would play upon me; you would seem to know
    my stops; you would pluck out the heart of my
    mystery; you would sound me from my lowest note to
    the top of my compass: and there is much music,
    excellent voice, in this little organ; yet cannot
    you make it speak. 'Sblood, do you think I am
    easier to be played on than a pipe? Call me what
    instrument you will, though you can fret me, yet you
    cannot play upon me.
 
 
 
HAMLET

    Now might I do it pat, now he is praying;
    And now I'll do't. And so he goes to heaven;
    And so am I revenged. That would be scann'd:
    A villain kills my father; and for that,
    I, his sole son, do this same villain send
    To heaven.
    O, this is hire and salary, not revenge.
    He took my father grossly, full of bread;
    With all his crimes broad blown, as flush as May;
    And how his audit stands who knows save heaven?
    But in our circumstance and course of thought,
    'Tis heavy with him: and am I then revenged,
    To take him in the purging of his soul,
    When he is fit and season'd for his passage?
    No!
    Up, sword; and know thou a more horrid hent:
    When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage,
    Or in the incestuous pleasure of his bed;
    At gaming, swearing, or about some act
    That has no relish of salvation in't;
    Then trip him, that his heels may kick at heaven,
    And that his soul may be as damn'd and black
    As hell, whereto it goes. My mother stays:
    This physic but prolongs thy sickly days.
 
 

HAMLET

    How all occasions do inform against me,
    And spur my dull revenge! What is a man,
    If his chief good and market of his time
    Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more.
    Sure, he that made us with such large discourse,
    Looking before and after, gave us not
    That capability and god-like reason
    To fust in us unused. Now, whether it be
    Bestial oblivion, or some craven scruple
    Of thinking too precisely on the event,
    A thought which, quarter'd, hath but one part wisdom
    And ever three parts coward, I do not know
    Why yet I live to say 'This thing's to do;'
    Sith I have cause and will and strength and means
    To do't. Examples gross as earth exhort me:
    Witness this army of such mass and charge
    Led by a delicate and tender prince,
    Whose spirit with divine ambition puff'd
    Makes mouths at the invisible event,
    Exposing what is mortal and unsure
    To all that fortune, death and danger dare,
    Even for an egg-shell. Rightly to be great
    Is not to stir without great argument,
    But greatly to find quarrel in a straw
    When honour's at the stake. How stand I then,
    That have a father kill'd, a mother stain'd,
    Excitements of my reason and my blood,
    And let all sleep? while, to my shame, I see
    The imminent death of twenty thousand men,
    That, for a fantasy and trick of fame,
    Go to their graves like beds, fight for a plot
    Whereon the numbers cannot try the cause,
    Which is not tomb enough and continent
    To hide the slain? O, from this time forth,
    My thoughts be bloody, or be nothing worth!
 
 
HAMLET

    Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio: a fellow
    of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy: he hath
    borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how
    abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rims at
    it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know
    not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your
    gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment,
    that were wont to set the table on a roar? Not one
    now, to mock your own grinning? quite chap-fallen?
    Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let
    her paint an inch thick, to this favour she must
    come; make her laugh at that.
 
HAMLET

    [Advancing] What is he whose grief
    Bears such an emphasis? whose phrase of sorrow
    Conjures the wandering stars, and makes them stand
    Like wonder-wounded hearers? This is I,
    Hamlet the Dane.

    Leaps into the grave

LAERTES

    The devil take thy soul!

    Grappling with him

HAMLET

    Thou pray'st not well.
    I prithee, take thy fingers from my throat;
    For, though I am not splenitive and rash,
    Yet have I something in me dangerous,
    Which let thy wiseness fear: hold off thy hand.
 
 
HAMLET

    I loved Ophelia: forty thousand brothers
    Could not, with all their quantity of love,
    Make up my sum. What wilt thou do for her?

KING CLAUDIUS

    O, he is mad, Laertes.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

    For love of God, forbear him.

HAMLET

    'Swounds, show me what thou'lt do:
    Woo't weep? woo't fight? woo't fast? woo't tear thyself?
    Woo't drink up eisel? eat a crocodile?
    I'll do't. Dost thou come here to whine?
    To outface me with leaping in her grave?
    Be buried quick with her, and so will I:
    And, if thou prate of mountains, let them throw
    Millions of acres on us, till our ground,
    Singeing his pate against the burning zone,
    Make Ossa like a wart! Nay, an thou'lt mouth,
    I'll rant as well as thou.
 

HAMLET

    Sir, in my heart there was a kind of fighting,
    That would not let me sleep: methought I lay
    Worse than the mutines in the bilboes. Rashly,
    And praised be rashness for it, let us know,
    Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well,
    When our deep plots do pall: and that should teach us
    There's a divinity that shapes our ends,
    Rough-hew them how we will,--

HORATIO

    That is most certain.

HAMLET

    Up from my cabin,
    My sea-gown scarf'd about me, in the dark
    Groped I to find out them; had my desire.
    Finger'd their packet, and in fine withdrew
    To mine own room again; making so bold,
    My fears forgetting manners, to unseal
    Their grand commission; where I found, Horatio,--
    O royal knavery!--an exact command,
    Larded with many several sorts of reasons
    Importing Denmark's health and England's too,
    With, ho! such bugs and goblins in my life,
    That, on the supervise, no leisure bated,
    No, not to stay the grinding of the axe,
    My head should be struck off.

HORATIO

    Is't possible?

HAMLET

    Here's the commission: read it at more leisure.
    But wilt thou hear me how I did proceed?

HORATIO

    I beseech you.

HAMLET

    Being thus be-netted round with villanies,--
    Ere I could make a prologue to my brains,
    They had begun the play--I sat me down,
    Devised a new commission, wrote it fair:
    I once did hold it, as our statists do,
    A baseness to write fair and labour'd much
    How to forget that learning, but, sir, now
    It did me yeoman's service: wilt thou know
    The effect of what I wrote?

HORATIO

    Ay, good my lord.

HAMLET

    An earnest conjuration from the king,
    As England was his faithful tributary,
    As love between them like the palm might flourish,
    As peace should stiff her wheaten garland wear
    And stand a comma 'tween their amities,
    And many such-like 'As'es of great charge,
    That, on the view and knowing of these contents,
    Without debatement further, more or less,
    He should the bearers put to sudden death,
    Not shriving-time allow'd.

HORATIO

    How was this seal'd?

HAMLET

    Why, even in that was heaven ordinant.
    I had my father's signet in my purse,
    Which was the model of that Danish seal;
    Folded the writ up in form of the other,
    Subscribed it, gave't the impression, placed it safely,
    The changeling never known. Now, the next day
    Was our sea-fight; and what to this was sequent
    Thou know'st already.

HORATIO

    So Guildenstern and Rosencrantz go to't.

HAMLET

    Why, man, they did make love to this employment;
    They are not near my conscience; their defeat
    Does by their own insinuation grow:
    'Tis dangerous when the baser nature comes
    Between the pass and fell incensed points
    Of mighty opposites.
 

HAMLET

    Heaven make thee free of it! I follow thee.
    I am dead, Horatio. Wretched queen, adieu!
    You that look pale and tremble at this chance,
    That are but mutes or audience to this act,
    Had I but time--as this fell sergeant, death,
    Is strict in his arrest--O, I could tell you--
    But let it be. Horatio, I am dead;
    Thou livest; report me and my cause aright
    To the unsatisfied.

HORATIO

    Never believe it:
    I am more an antique Roman than a Dane:
    Here's yet some liquor left.

HAMLET

    As thou'rt a man,
    Give me the cup: let go; by heaven, I'll have't.
    O good Horatio, what a wounded name,
    Things standing thus unknown, shall live behind me!
    If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart
    Absent thee from felicity awhile,
    And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain,
    To tell my story.

    March afar off, and shot within

    What warlike noise is this?

OSRIC

    Young Fortinbras, with conquest come from Poland,
    To the ambassadors of England gives
    This warlike volley.

HAMLET

    O, I die, Horatio;
    The potent poison quite o'er-crows my spirit:
    I cannot live to hear the news from England;
    But I do prophesy the election lights
    On Fortinbras: he has my dying voice;
    So tell him, with the occurrents, more and less,
    Which have solicited. The rest is silence.

 
 

================================================================

Macbeth
    To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
    To the last syllable of recorded time,
    And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
    The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
    Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
    That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
    And then is heard no more: it is a tale
    Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing.

    Enter a Messenger

    Thou comest to use thy tongue; thy story quickly.

Messenger

    Gracious my lord,
    I should report that which I say I saw,
    But know not how to do it.

MACBETH

    Well, say, sir.

Messenger

    As I did stand my watch upon the hill,
    I look'd toward Birnam, and anon, methought,
    The wood began to move.

MACBETH

    Liar and slave!

Messenger

    Let me endure your wrath, if't be not so:
    Within this three mile may you see it coming;
    I say, a moving grove.

MACBETH

    If thou speak'st false,
    Upon the next tree shalt thou hang alive,
    Till famine cling thee: if thy speech be sooth,
    I care not if thou dost for me as much.
    I pull in resolution, and begin
    To doubt the equivocation of the fiend
    That lies like truth: 'Fear not, till Birnam wood
    Do come to Dunsinane:' and now a wood
    Comes toward Dunsinane. Arm, arm, and out!
    If this which he avouches does appear,
    There is nor flying hence nor tarrying here.
    I gin to be aweary of the sun,
    And wish the estate o' the world were now undone.
    Ring the alarum-bell! Blow, wind! come, wrack!
    At least we'll die with harness on our back.
 
 
 
 

================================================================

Merchant Of Venice

SALARINO

    Why, I am sure, if he forfeit, thou wilt not take
    his flesh: what's that good for?

SHYLOCK

    To bait fish withal: if it will feed nothing else,
    it will feed my revenge. He hath disgraced me, and
    hindered me half a million; laughed at my losses,
    mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my
    bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine
    enemies; and what's his reason? I am a Jew. Hath
    not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs,
    dimensions, senses, affections, passions? fed with
    the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject
    to the same diseases, healed by the same means,
    warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as
    a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed?
    if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison
    us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not
    revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will
    resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian,
    what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian
    wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by
    Christian example? Why, revenge. The villany you
    teach me, I will execute, and it shall go hard but I
    will better the instruction.
 

SHYLOCK

    I have possess'd your grace of what I purpose;
    And by our holy Sabbath have I sworn
    To have the due and forfeit of my bond:
    If you deny it, let the danger light
    Upon your charter and your city's freedom.
    You'll ask me, why I rather choose to have
    A weight of carrion flesh than to receive
    Three thousand ducats: I'll not answer that:
    But, say, it is my humour: is it answer'd?
    What if my house be troubled with a rat
    And I be pleased to give ten thousand ducats
    To have it baned? What, are you answer'd yet?
    Some men there are love not a gaping pig;
    Some, that are mad if they behold a cat;
    And others, when the bagpipe sings i' the nose,
    Cannot contain their urine: for affection,
    Mistress of passion, sways it to the mood
    Of what it likes or loathes. Now, for your answer:
    As there is no firm reason to be render'd,
    Why he cannot abide a gaping pig;
    Why he, a harmless necessary cat;
    Why he, a woollen bagpipe; but of force
    Must yield to such inevitable shame
    As to offend, himself being offended;
    So can I give no reason, nor I will not,
    More than a lodged hate and a certain loathing
    I bear Antonio, that I follow thus
    A losing suit against him. Are you answer'd?
 

SHYLOCK

    What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong?
    You have among you many a purchased slave,
    Which, like your asses and your dogs and mules,
    You use in abject and in slavish parts,
    Because you bought them: shall I say to you,
    Let them be free, marry them to your heirs?
    Why sweat they under burthens? let their beds
    Be made as soft as yours and let their palates
    Be season'd with such viands? You will answer
    'The slaves are ours:' so do I answer you:
    The pound of flesh, which I demand of him,
    Is dearly bought; 'tis mine and I will have it.
    If you deny me, fie upon your law!
    There is no force in the decrees of Venice.
    I stand for judgment: answer; shall I have it?

 
================================================================

Richard III

Act 1 - Scene 1
Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York;
And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths;
Our bruised arms hung up for monuments;
Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings,
Our dreadful marches to delightful measures.
Grim-visaged war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front;
And now, instead of mounting barded steeds
To fright the souls of fearful adversaries,
He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber
To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.
But I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks,
Nor made to court an amorous looking-glass;
I, that am rudely stamp'd, and want love's majesty
To strut before a wanton ambling nymph;
I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion,
Cheated of feature by dissembling nature,
Deformed, unfinish'd, sent before my time
Into this breathing world, scarce half made up,
And that so lamely and unfashionable
That dogs bark at me as I halt by them;
Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace,
Have no delight to pass away the time,
Unless to spy my shadow in the sun
And descant on mine own deformity:
And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover,
To entertain these fair well-spoken days,
I am determined to prove a villain
And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
Plots have I laid, inductions dangerous,
By drunken prophecies, libels and dreams,
To set my brother Clarence and the king
In deadly hate the one against the other:
And if King Edward be as true and just
As I am subtle, false and treacherous,
This day should Clarence closely be mew'd up,
About a prophecy, which says that 'G'
Of Edward's heirs the murderer shall be.
Dive, thoughts, down to my soul: here
Clarence comes.
 
 

Give me another horse: bind up my wounds.
Have mercy, Jesu!--Soft! I did but dream.
O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!
The lights burn blue. It is now dead midnight.
Cold fearful drops stand on my trembling flesh.
What do I fear? myself? there's none else by:
Richard loves Richard; that is, I am I.
Is there a murderer here? No. Yes, I am:
Then fly. What, from myself? Great reason why:
Lest I revenge. What, myself upon myself?
Alack. I love myself. Wherefore? for any good
That I myself have done unto myself?
O, no! alas, I rather hate myself
For hateful deeds committed by myself!
I am a villain: yet I lie. I am not.
Fool, of thyself speak well: fool, do not flatter.
My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
And every tongue brings in a several tale,
And every tale condemns me for a villain.
Perjury, perjury, in the high'st degree
Murder, stem murder, in the direst degree;
All several sins, all used in each degree,
Throng to the bar, crying all, Guilty! guilty!
I shall despair. There is no creature loves me;
And if I die, no soul shall pity me:
Nay, wherefore should they, since that I myself
Find in myself no pity to myself?
Methought the souls of all that I had murder'd
Came to my tent; and every one did threat
To-morrow's vengeance on the head of Richard.
 

================================================================

Othello

OTHELLO

    Soft you; a word or two before you go.
    I have done the state some service, and they know't.
    No more of that. I pray you, in your letters,
    When you shall these unlucky deeds relate,
    Speak of me as I am; nothing extenuate,
    Nor set down aught in malice: then must you speak
    Of one that loved not wisely but too well;
    Of one not easily jealous, but being wrought
    Perplex'd in the extreme; of one whose hand,
    Like the base Indian, threw a pearl away
    Richer than all his tribe; of one whose subdued eyes,
    Albeit unused to the melting mood,
    Drop tears as fast as the Arabian trees
    Their medicinal gum. Set you down this;
    And say besides, that in Aleppo once,
    Where a malignant and a turban'd Turk
    Beat a Venetian and traduced the state,
    I took by the throat the circumcised dog,
    And smote him, thus.
 

================================================================

Romeo and Juliet

ROMEO

    Is it even so? then I defy you, stars!
    Thou know'st my lodging: get me ink and paper,
    And hire post-horses; I will hence to-night.

BALTHASAR

    I do beseech you, sir, have patience:
    Your looks are pale and wild, and do import
    Some misadventure.

ROMEO

    Tush, thou art deceived:
    Leave me, and do the thing I bid thee do.
    Hast thou no letters to me from the friar?

BALTHASAR

    No, my good lord.

ROMEO

    No matter: get thee gone,
    And hire those horses; I'll be with thee straight.

    Exit BALTHASAR

    Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee to-night.
    Let's see for means: O mischief, thou art swift
    To enter in the thoughts of desperate men!
    I do remember an apothecary,--
    And hereabouts he dwells,--which late I noted
    In tatter'd weeds, with overwhelming brows,
    Culling of simples; meagre were his looks,
    Sharp misery had worn him to the bones:
    And in his needy shop a tortoise hung,
    An alligator stuff'd, and other skins
    Of ill-shaped fishes; and about his shelves
    A beggarly account of empty boxes,
    Green earthen pots, bladders and musty seeds,
    Remnants of packthread and old cakes of roses,
    Were thinly scatter'd, to make up a show.
    Noting this penury, to myself I said
    'An if a man did need a poison now,
    Whose sale is present death in Mantua,
    Here lives a caitiff wretch would sell it him.'
    O, this same thought did but forerun my need;
    And this same needy man must sell it me.
    As I remember, this should be the house.
    Being holiday, the beggar's shop is shut.
    What, ho! apothecary!

    Enter Apothecary

Apothecary

    Who calls so loud?

ROMEO

    Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor:
    Hold, there is forty ducats: let me have
    A dram of poison, such soon-speeding gear
    As will disperse itself through all the veins
    That the life-weary taker may fall dead
    And that the trunk may be discharged of breath
    As violently as hasty powder fired
    Doth hurry from the fatal cannon's womb.

Apothecary

    Such mortal drugs I have; but Mantua's law
    Is death to any he that utters them.

ROMEO

    Art thou so bare and full of wretchedness,
    And fear'st to die? famine is in thy cheeks,
    Need and oppression starveth in thine eyes,
    Contempt and beggary hangs upon thy back;
    The world is not thy friend nor the world's law;
    The world affords no law to make thee rich;
    Then be not poor, but break it, and take this.

Apothecary

    My poverty, but not my will, consents.

ROMEO

    I pay thy poverty, and not thy will.

Apothecary

    Put this in any liquid thing you will,
    And drink it off; and, if you had the strength
    Of twenty men, it would dispatch you straight.

ROMEO

    There is thy gold, worse poison to men's souls,
    Doing more murders in this loathsome world,
    Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.
    I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none.
    Farewell: buy food, and get thyself in flesh.
    Come, cordial and not poison, go with me
    To Juliet's grave; for there must I use thee.
 
 
 

ROMEO

    Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.
    Hold, take this letter; early in the morning
    See thou deliver it to my lord and father.
    Give me the light: upon thy life, I charge thee,
    Whate'er thou hear'st or seest, stand all aloof,
    And do not interrupt me in my course.
    Why I descend into this bed of death,
    Is partly to behold my lady's face;
    But chiefly to take thence from her dead finger
    A precious ring, a ring that I must use
    In dear employment: therefore hence, be gone:
    But if thou, jealous, dost return to pry
    In what I further shall intend to do,
    By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint
    And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs:
    The time and my intents are savage-wild,
    More fierce and more inexorable far
    Than empty tigers or the roaring sea.

BALTHASAR

    I will be gone, sir, and not trouble you.

ROMEO

    So shalt thou show me friendship. Take thou that:
    Live, and be prosperous: and farewell, good fellow.

BALTHASAR

    [Aside] For all this same, I'll hide me hereabout:
    His looks I fear, and his intents I doubt.

    Retires

ROMEO

    Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
    Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth,
    Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
    And, in despite, I'll cram thee with more food!

    Opens the tomb

PARIS

    This is that banish'd haughty Montague,
    That murder'd my love's cousin, with which grief,
    It is supposed, the fair creature died;
    And here is come to do some villanous shame
    To the dead bodies: I will apprehend him.

    Comes forward

    Stop thy unhallow'd toil, vile Montague!
    Can vengeance be pursued further than death?
    Condemned villain, I do apprehend thee:
    Obey, and go with me; for thou must die.

ROMEO

    I must indeed; and therefore came I hither.
    Good gentle youth, tempt not a desperate man;
    Fly hence, and leave me: think upon these gone;
    Let them affright thee. I beseech thee, youth,
    Put not another sin upon my head,
    By urging me to fury: O, be gone!
    By heaven, I love thee better than myself;
    For I come hither arm'd against myself:
    Stay not, be gone; live, and hereafter say,
    A madman's mercy bade thee run away.

PARIS

    I do defy thy conjurations,
    And apprehend thee for a felon here.

ROMEO

    Wilt thou provoke me? then have at thee, boy!

    They fight

PAGE

    O Lord, they fight! I will go call the watch.

    Exit

PARIS

    O, I am slain!

    Falls

    If thou be merciful,
    Open the tomb, lay me with Juliet.

    Dies

ROMEO

    In faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.
    Mercutio's kinsman, noble County Paris!
    What said my man, when my betossed soul
    Did not attend him as we rode? I think
    He told me Paris should have married Juliet:
    Said he not so? or did I dream it so?
    Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet,
    To think it was so? O, give me thy hand,
    One writ with me in sour misfortune's book!
    I'll bury thee in a triumphant grave;
    A grave? O no! a lantern, slaughter'd youth,
    For here lies Juliet, and her beauty makes
    This vault a feasting presence full of light.
    Death, lie thou there, by a dead man interr'd.

    Laying PARIS in the tomb

    How oft when men are at the point of death
    Have they been merry! which their keepers call
    A lightning before death: O, how may I
    Call this a lightning? O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer'd; beauty's ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death's pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here's to my love!

    Drinks

    O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

 
================================================================

King Lear
Act 5
KING LEAR

    Pray, do not mock me:
    I am a very foolish fond old man,
    Fourscore and upward, not an hour more nor less;
    And, to deal plainly,
    I fear I am not in my perfect mind.
    Methinks I should know you, and know this man;
    Yet I am doubtful for I am mainly ignorant
    What place this is; and all the skill I have
    Remembers not these garments; nor I know not
    Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me;
    For, as I am a man, I think this lady
    To be my child Cordelia.

CORDELIA

    And so I am, I am.

KING LEAR

    Be your tears wet? yes, 'faith. I pray, weep not:
    If you have poison for me, I will drink it.
    I know you do not love me; for your sisters
    Have, as I do remember, done me wrong:
    You have some cause, they have not.

CORDELIA

    No cause, no cause.
 
 
Royal Shakespeare Company

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